Tuesday, June 25, 2013

Make a maypole

Midsummer is now behind us, but dancing around the maypole can be done all summer long. And you know what? This maypole is the EASIEST thing to make. Whenever it comes to actually having to construct something, I get really nervous and anxious--the same way I feel about cooking. I was really hesitant to make a maypole just for that reason, but with a little help from my friends at Home Depot, I think I came up with the easiest solution (with a nod to Martha's maypole) that can be done by yourself for really cheap, which are my two requirements for most things in life.

You will need: 10 foot 3/4" pole (I got a galvanized metal pipe for $1.59 from Home Depot), a metal circle that fits onto the top of it (I have no idea what the proper term is called, but show them the picture or go to the plumbing section), a wooden circle 8" (mine is from Joann), nails (with a top that is wider than the 4 small holes in the metal circle), glue that holds metal, white spray paint, thumbtacks, ribbon (I got 18' ribbon from Joann)
Step 1: Fit the metal circle onto the end of the pole. Make sure the circle is flush with the pole. Mine fit without sliding down, but if yours is sliding a bit, add some glue onto both the pole and circle and leave it to dry over night. 

Step 2: Add some glue onto the top of the metal circle and to the bottom of the wooden circle in the center that fits the width of the metal circle. Leave it to dry.

Step 3: When it's all dry, add in the nails into the four small holes.

Step 4: Spray paint it all white. Let it sit over night.

Step 5: Find the center of the ribbon and center it onto the wooden circle. Tack both sides of the ribbon onto the circle.

Step 6: Take your next ribbon and do the same. Continue adding on more colors. Each side of the ribbon will be for one dancer.

Step 7: If you're adding flowers, use a circle flower oasis from the craft store. Use wires to secure it onto thumb tacks.

TO PUT THE MAYPOLE INTO THE GROUND:

Materials: 4' rebar 1/2", hammer

Step 1: Hammer the rebar into the ground. Here the ground was so hard we only got it in about 5", but it was secure! 
Step 2: Slide the pole onto the rebar. If needed, dig the pole into the ground a bit too.
This Midsummer series was a collaboration between Ciara Richardson, the photographer, Ashley Beyer of Tinge Floral, and myself. To learn more about how to celebrate Swedish Midsummer, check out last week's post. And once again, a huge thank you to my helpers: Audrey EllsworthMaurine Anderson, Carla da Silva, Maude Lee, Jenny Ellsworth 

3 comments:

Angeline Indriani said...

This is so beautiful. =)
I wish there is some beautiful space in my hometown so we could organize an event like that.

Angel on Rustic Modernist.

Igor Josifovic said...

Lovely DIY idea:-) It is also very traditional to have maypoles in Bavaria. Have a great week all the way from Munich!

Anonymous said...

I am currently making this, and just want to make a note for anyone else:
- the circle is called a "floor flange"
- the electrical conduits are the cheap pipes, not the ones in plumbing!